Listening Lawn FAQ
The Lone Bellow burst onto the scene with their self-titled debut in 2013. The Nashville-based trio (Zach Williams, Brian Elmquist, Kanene Pipkin) quickly became known for their transcendent harmonies, serious musicianship and raucous live performance — creating what NPR calls, 'earnest and magnetic folk-pop built to shake the rafters.' In 2015, the band released Then Came The Morning, produced by The National's Aaron Dessner. The album was nominated for an Americana Music Award and took the band to numerous late night shows including Jimmy Kimmel Live, Late Show With David Letterman and Later…with Jools Holland, among others. In 2017, The Lone Bellow returned with Walk Into A Storm, produced by legendary music producer Dave Cobb (Chris Stapleton, Brandi Carlile, Sturgill Simpson), followed by 2020's Half Moon Light, an artistic triumph the band worked toward for years.

In a departure from their past work with elite producers Dessner and Cobb, the trio struck out on their own for their fifth full-length album Love Songs for Losers, dreaming up a singular sound encompassing everything from arena-ready rock anthems to the gorgeously sprawling Americana tunes the band refers to as "little redneck symphonies." Recorded at the possibly haunted former home of the legendary Roy Orbison, the result is an intimate meditation on the pain and joy and ineffable wonder of being human, at turns heartbreaking, irreverent, and sublimely transcendent.

After sketching the album's 11 songs in a nearby church, the band holed up for eight weeks at Orbison's house on Old Hickory Lake, slowly carving out their most expansive and eclectic body of work yet. Co-produced by Elmquist and Jacob Sooter, Love Songs for Losers also finds Pipkin taking the reins as vocal producer, expertly harnessing the rarefied vocal magic they've brought to the stage in touring with the likes of Maren Morris and Kacey Musgraves.

For The Lone Bellow, the triumph of completing their first self-produced album marks the start of a thrilling new chapter in the band's journey. "At the outset it was scary to take away the safety net of working with a big-name producer and lean on each other instead," says Pipkin. "It took an incredible amount of trust, but in the end it was so exciting to see each other rise to new heights." And with the release of Love Songs for Losers, the trio feel newly emboldened to create without limits. "This album confirmed that we still have beauty to create and put out into the world, and that we're still having fun doing that after ten years together," says Elmquist. "It reminded us of our passion for pushing ourselves out onto the limb and letting our minds wander into new places, and it sets me on fire to think of what we might make next."

Special Guest

Nathaniel Riley

Nathaniel Riley, a folk singer/songwriter from South Dakota, put in his time working the small family farm and recording melancholic melodies in his basement. Treading with years of grief that constructed a cloud full of songs that Nathaniel lugged to Colorado began the process of his debut full length album, "Bird Songs" Nathaniel's songscapes lean on your heartstrings, unpacking melodies like a nostalgic lucid dream. Acoustically driven, wistful lyricism and ambient instrumentation provide the bedrock for his contemporary folktales. Compiling miles of desolation, heartache, introspection and memories of the forest and the prairie's whistle that convey him to persist. Empowering his songs their role, to be a beacon on the hill. The sound and songs arrived abundantly, easily and honestly. Nathaniel began recording his album "Bird Songs," with Aaron Youngberg at Swingfingers Recording Studios in Fort Collins, Colorado in September of 2020. Darren Garvey came on as a producer for the record, bringing a grass-roots perspective and an experimental, contemporary ear. "I always loved pushing the boundaries of genres and wanted to create something familiar to myself in a couple different ways. One of which was to bring ambient ethereal sounds to the record that may not be commonly found on records claiming to be primarily folk," says Riley. "I love the process of recording and the almost immortal aspect it provides," Riley says. "You will forever hear the person's skin on the strings, the breath before they sing. Living proof of somebody being alive, and it remains there, like a little memory box of sound forever. Itself, never changing."

The only thing as good as the show? The drink you have after

GRAB A BITE, BEFORE OR AFTER

A few short steps from Midtown is One Twenty Three—our neighborly New American Tavern, serving hearty dishes with modern flare.